Guest Blogger: Aminata Dansoko

Fun Does Not Destroy Our Education Instead, It Helps It

A science geek that I am, I was on the ScienceNews website to check out some new in the science world. I came across this article call “Skateboarders Rock Physics.”

The article talks about how Skateboarders are learning physics without realizing that they are. The way the jump and do tricks are all in the name of physics.

It is said that Skateboarders use their intuition and motor memory to determine that a sharp early descent creates a speed advantage and this is something not even physicists can grasp the idea of. So Skateboarding has it advantages in that a skateboarder might know more physics then a person with a PhD in physics. This is amazing.

Now it is up to you to decide if you believe this or not. But I think education is not just want we learn in school. It is more than that, sometimes we learn more outside the walls of a class. I challenge you to go have fun and see the relation between what you learn in class and the activity your doing. You might just find a connection!!! Skateboarder’s certainly have.

Advertisements

8 thoughts on “Guest Blogger: Aminata Dansoko

  1. This post is pretty amazing. Ive never actually even thought about something so unique like this. We all think of skateboarders as these guys who have no life and just cruise around all day doing the most outrageous tricks. And after seeing this blog, i think its awesome. When you put things into perspective its crazy how skateboarding is actually its own class of physics. The positioning of their feet on the board, the different variatios of tricks and spins that the board make and the ramps in which the boarders go down and grind on. After thinking about it and reading this post i completely agree with the fact that we dont learn just from school and our classes. We can skateboard around and apply physics to it. It doesnt just involve skateboarding but it makes us realize how the things we do in our daily lives help us learn different aspects of things we think we can only relate to in the classroom.

  2. GT says:

    It does not surprise me that skateboarders know something more about physics than does a person with a PhD in physics. I took Spanish 1 for 5 years throughout middle and upper school and I never once passed. It finally came to a point were my principal was like “Ok, you can be exempt from taking a language to graduate”. A few years later at a restaurant I worked at all of the cooks and busboys were of some Hispanic descent and only spoke Spanish. Throughout the few years that I worked at this restaurant I learned more Spanish than I had in the 5 years that I took Spanish 1 in school. It’s something about the school setting versus the reality and actual experience. It was way easier for me to understand what they were saying because I was their with them and through their tone and the environment I could make out what they were saying and eventually I could communicate with them way more. It’s very interesting how that works. It’s like how we learn from our mistakes, we learn from experience.

  3. Anonymous says:

    Fun Does Not Destroy Our Education Instead, It Helps It
    By Jolyon Davis

    I believe education is perceived not only within the realm of the class room, but also in things we do in a regular basis, such as sports, our jobs, and home. There are so many things we learn in our environment today that can labeled as education even though we are no in a school setting. In this article the whole aspect of skate boarders doing physics a type of math and science when skating is interesting but also cool. If you truly think upon it they are. The velocity they have to ride to get a certain amplitude or height in the air, then doing degree angles of 360, 275, and 250 in the air. Lastly then having to land at the proper angle to then stop their forward motion, also known as action potential. It’s all science if you think about it like this. From the mass of the skate-boarder, the acceleration, angles up the ramps, and rotation in the air, it’s all like a big math equation. The rider also has to be able to direct their speed and weight into a given trick or ramp they do. The incorrect speed and body weight into a jump could cause an injury or wrong solution in physics terms. I know for myself playing sports, you do a lot of things dealing with math. You deal with angles, patterns, and counts. They all play a role in the execution of a game plan, or any given play during the game. There is so much that can be taught outside the environment of the class room, yes an in school environment teaches you the basic math, science, history, and English, but outside in the real world broadens the horizon to so much more unfound learning. So I agree with this article, it’s great to be academically smart, but being able to use what you learned in the classroom and be able to apply those skills, and use them precisely are making them that much better of resources and also skills that can be used throughout your life every day.

    • stfeldman says:

      First of all Aminata, you are in no way a geek for checking out the Science News website. In fact, I think it makes the rest of us look bad for not doing such a thing. I love the point you are making in this post. Often times in classes, especially in math or science, I quickly loose interest when I do not see how the topic relates directly to me. Is that selfish? Maybe. But I think that is often how students and adults alike respond to new information. Its one thing when you are given a lecture, but another thing when you see how it directly applies to you or something you are interested in. As a junior in high school, we were learning about parabolas. Boring, right? But it quickly became interesting when our teacher showed us a video of him sky diving in Australia. His trajectory off of the platform, to the water, and back up, was in the shape of a parabola. Suddenly, a mathematic shape became fun because it was presented in an exciting way. I couldn’t tell you much about what I learned in high school math, but that lesson stuck because it was fun.
      Often I find myself zoning out during class or while doing homework. Sometimes it can feel like words are being spoken AT me and not TO me. Not only is this a waste of time and energy for me, but professors as well. I agree with you completely when you say that we should seek to make connections between what we learn and what we like to do. If we are able to make these connections, suddenly our most boring class may become our most interesting.

  4. I don’t think that people realize how powerful fun is and I’m so glad that your post brought attention to this fact. Like GT commented, many educators are realizing that the classroom is not always that place were the greatest learning takes place. Besides, despite our attempts to prolong our official entry into adulthood, we will all ultimately have to leave the comfort of the classroom and apply what we have learned there to the “real world”. I think that fun is such an amazing tool in order to help us make that transition easier, as well as to make our lives better. Volkswagen has recently started “The Fun Theory” which uses fun in order to help people make conscious like turning a staircase in a subway station into a giant, functioning piano to promote exercise instead of taking the escalators. I spent about a whole Saturday watching all of the videos of these projects being implemented in real life and seeing how making things fun like recycling or going the speed limit can help to improve our society. If this is true, then why shouldn’t it carry over into the education sphere? There is the issue that not everyone finds the same things fun, so there can’t be a universal curriculum built on fun.There is also the reluctance of students to participate in something that their teacher insist is fun (because what do teachers know about fun?) Because of these things, there needs to be a very careful integration of fun into our educational system. We need to teach without letting the students to know that they’re having fun, and we need to teach in a way that caters to the individual. Students should be allowed to choose how they want to learn, and, when acceptable, what they want to learn. It’s logical that a student does better in a subject that he finds interesting, that he finds fun. There are, of course, going to be some subjects that a person just doesn’t have an affinity for, and it is here that fun can be such a powerful tool. By secretly integrating fun into the subject, the student won’t dread doing the work as much. This theory should be implemented at a young age in order to stop negative feelings toward certain subjects as soon as possible. Fun should then be continually implemented throughout the school years but in an increasingly subtle fashion. One of the things that I was looking forward to the most about college was the opportunity to choose my own classes and to create a unique educational path that would be most enjoyable for me. Now obviously elementary schools can’t allow there students to choose what they want to learn, but they can instill joy into every subject so that the students wouldn’t be able to choose which subject is most enjoyable.

  5. Anonymous says:

    First of all Aminata, you are in no way a geek for checking out the Science News website. In fact, I think it makes the rest of us look bad for not doing such a thing. I love the point you are making in this post. Often times in classes, especially in math or science, I quickly loose interest when I do not see how the topic relates directly to me. Is that selfish? Maybe. But I think that is often how students and adults alike respond to new information. Its one thing when you are given a lecture, but another thing when you see how it directly applies to you or something you are interested in. As a junior in high school, we were learning about parabolas. Boring, right? But it quickly became interesting when our teacher showed us a video of him sky diving in Australia. His trajectory off of the platform, to the water, and back up, was in the shape of a parabola. Suddenly, a mathematic shape became fun because it was presented in an exciting way. I couldn’t tell you much about what I learned in high school math, but that lesson stuck because it was fun.
    Often I find myself zoning out during class or while doing homework. Sometimes it can feel like words are being spoken AT me and not TO me. Not only is this a waste of time and energy for me, but professors as well. I agree with you completely when you say that we should seek to make connections between what we learn and what we like to do. If we are able to make these connections, suddenly our most boring class may become our most interesting.

  6. Oct 18 Blogger- Aminata Dansoko

    I am completely taken back by this woman. Even though there are still inequalities in America between women and men, we have come a long way so it is shocking to be shown how bad it still is in other countries. This brings me to my next point, why aren’t people like her broadcasted all over the world?! Why don’t people talk about how much strength and effort she has instead of who wore what at the Grammy’s. I also can’t believe that she was able to come to Hobart and William Smith and that I missed it! Even though she passed away recently, she definitely seems like a person who did anything but waste her life. I hope to see and hear about more people like her in the world.

  7. Nov 20 Blogger- Aminata Dansoko

    I found this article to be fascinating. I myself skateboard all the time here at school and back home. I have grown up skateboarding from a young age. I have always been kind of aware of the physics that go into skateboarding as this article talks about but it was never a main focus of mind. I do agree that you can learn a lot outside of the classroom walls. Perhaps when learning about physics if a teacher used skateboarding as an example or took a field trip to a skate park, students would have a better understanding of the material being taught. If one could apply this to a lot of other topics/subjects in schools, I think not only would one be able to see positive results from students but also it would make learning fun for kids. You can never underestimate the power of fun.

    CG sorry again for the post above copied it in the wrong date.

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: